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Health Ministries 2017

Vitamin D

Vitamin D      - What you Need to Know

 Article by Health Ministries Leader Racquel Murray 

 

 

 

 Who is at risk of vitamin D deficiency

[1]People over 65 years old because their skin is not as good at making vitamin D

[2] People with darker skin tone – that is people of Asian, African, Afro-Caribbean and middle Eastern decent – living in the U.K. Or other northern climates.

[3] Anyone who spends little time outdoors –house bound, shop or office workers, night shift workers

[4]Babies and young children who spend little time 

Playing outside.

[5] Pregnant women and breastfeeding women

Which foods contain vitamin D?

Sunshine, not food, is where most of your vitamin D comes from.  So even a healthy well-balanced diet, that provides all the other vitamins and goodness you need, is unlikely to provide enough vitamin D.

 

Non vegetarians

Vegetarians

Vegan

Salmon

Egg yoke

Orange juice

Sardine

Margarine

Fortified soya milk/ yoghurt

Pilchards

Fortified breakfast cereal

Fortified Almond milk

Trout

Milk

Fortified coconut milk

Herring

Fortified infant formula

 Fortified Tofu

Kippers

Fortified-yoghurt

Cereals fortified with vitamin D

Cod liver oil

Cheese

 

Fortified yoghurts

 

 

Offals

 

 

 

What is Vitamin D and why do I need it

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin ( stored in fat and is also a hormone. It's is beneficial in helping the body to absorb calcium, which is beneficial for strong bones and teeth. 

 Consequences of vitamin D deficiency

 

Low levels of vitamin D can cause osteoporosis ( thinning of bone, osteopenia ( reduce bone mass),  and osteomalacia ( softening of bones).

 

Babies born with low levels of vitamin D  and those who do not get enough from breast milk could developed Rickets. Older children who do not get enough vitamin D can also develops rickets.  Rickets or “bow leg” can cause permanent deformities to the bone,, weaken muscles and reduced growth.  Low levels of vitamin D may put men at increased risk of colorectal cancer and women at increased risk of developing breast cancer.

 

 

 The vegan diet contains little, if any, vitamin D without fortified foods or supplements. Most people get some of the vitamin D intake through sun exposure, but this depends upon season, time of day, length of day, a cloud covering, smoke, skin colour, and sunscreen use.  It’s important to note that many supplements with vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) are of animal origin; vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) is produced from yeast and is acceptable to vegans. 

 

 

 

          



 

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